Coaching with GROW Model

GROW stands for the phases of a coaching session:
Goals, Reality, Options and Will. The model advises the coach and coachee to:

  1. set goals,
  2. explore the reality of a situation,
  3. generate options, and,
  4. commit to actions.
  • Awareness : Raising a coachee's awareness of a situation
  • Responsibility : Generating a feeling of responsibility in the coachee
  • Goals : Setting goals with a coachee
  • Reality : Examining the facts or “reality” of the situation
  • Options : Reviewing the options
  • Will : Deciding what to do next

The coach is not required to follow the steps sequentially, but rather move among the steps as the coaching conversation allows.
The goal of the GROW model is to increase the coachee's Awareness and Responsibility.
Awareness – which includes self-awareness – enables the coachee to understand what is happening in the in the situation, to include how his/her emotions and perceptions affect, and are affected by, the situation. Responsibility is crucial to performance because it implies ownership and empowerment. Raising awareness and generating responsibility are keys to successful coaching. Without them, lasting change and progress are impossible.

  • What was it like?
  • What is happening now?
  • Where are you today? (with this?)
  • How do you feel about it?
  • What is making you feel uncomfortable?
  • How often does it happen?
  • What's happened so far?
  • What have you done so far (to try and resolve it)?
  • How did others react?
  • What are the facts?
  • What are some examples?
  • What happened? (when?)
  • What (who) else is involved?
  • So I think what I’m hearing you say is… (reflecting back the coachee’s last answer to confirm your understanding) …is that right?
  • What could you do?
  • How might you go about solving …?
  • How would someone else approach it?
  • Who's good at this?
  • If you could do anything what would you do?
  • If there were no constraints what would happen?
  • Think about having solved the problem; what happened?
  • WHAT IF … you knew the answer? What would it be?
  • WHAT IF … that obstacle did not exist?
  • Which of these options is most attractive?
  • What would it take to be able to do this?
  • I've seen people do this .. and .. what I noticed was ..
  • Would you like a suggestion from me?
  • Who else could help?
  • If this were your business what would you do?
  • If you put yourself in their shoes what would YOU want?
  • What do you think would be most effective /bring the most return?
  • Which option do you want to pursue further?
  • What extra help / resources might you need?
  • What else will it take to achieve your goal?
  • How important is it to do it?
  • What would help / assist (or hinder!) you in doing this?
  • What other considerations do you have?
  • What is the subject you want to work on during this session?
  • What do you want to achieve by the end of this session?
  • What do you want to achieve in the long run?
  • How far do you expect to get toward your goals during this session?
  • What time frame do you expect for the achievement of your final goals?
  • What intermediate goals or objectives can you identify with time frames?
  • On a scale of 1 to 10, how important is the achievement of this goal to you?
  • What will success look like?
  • Tips
  • Ensure that goals are SMART: Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Reasonable, Timely
  • Ensure that goals are positively stated.
  • Ensure that goals are clearly understood by both the coach and the person being coached.
  • Start broad– then narrow the goal to follow the interests and energy of the person.
  • Remember that the problem presented to you is often different from the real issue.
  • Examine the “reality” of a goal– if it is not realistic, reset it!
  • Traps
  • Don’t try to influence the person to set a goal which YOU think is right or appropriate.
  • Don’t establish long-term goals without creating shorter-term goals to support them.
  • The session goal:
  • You can begin a coaching session by determining a goal for the session itself. If the person has requested coaching, he will need to define what he wants to achieve from it. Even if you, the coach, have initiated the session in response to a specific issue, you can still solicit input from the person about what he or she would like to achieve during a session.
  • The long-term goal:
  • The longer-term goal, what the person would like ultimately to achieve, can be divided into two categories: Performance Goals and End Goals.
  • What are the relevant facts describing the current situation?
  • What led up to the current situation?
  • What additional details can you provide?
  • What else?
  • Who else is involved with or affected by this situation?
  • How much control do you have over the outcome?
  • Who else must you depend upon and how much must you depend upon them?
  • What actions have you already taken?
  • What has prevented you from doing more?
  • What are the internal and external obstacles?
  • What resources do you have?
  • What additional resources do you need?
  • What is the real issue here – the core of the problem?
  • What are the facts that make you believe this?
  • Tips
  • Be reflective. Paraphrase the person's statements to ensure that you have a common understanding.
  • Work at raising Awareness, i.e., learning and helping the person to learn more about what the real problem is and how the details of the current situation are related.
  • Strive to remove distractions, both internal and external.
  • Notice what the person considers important, and follow that line of thinking.
  • Encourage self assessment, perhaps on a scale of 1-10.
  • If necessary, suggest a change in the goal of the conversation to reflect the reality of the situation.
  • Traps
  • Never assume that you know the facts before you have investigated the problem.
  • Remember that the purpose is to raise the coachee's awareness, not to become an expert on the coachee's situation.
  • What are all the different ways you could achieve the goals?
  • What additional alternatives might you have if things were different?
  • What steps could you take to get started?
  • What additional actions could you take?
  • What could you do with more time, money, resources, or authority?
  • What steps could you take to get more of whatever you need?
  • Who could you get to help?
  • When could you begin to take action?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of each alternative?
  • Which alternatives give you the best results?
  • Would you like to add a suggestion from me?
  • Which of the considered actions feels best to you?
  • On a scale of 1 to 10, how well will each option achieve your goals?
  • Tips
  • Establish the reality of the situation before beginning to explore options.
  • Allow the person to exhaust all possible ideas of his/her own before offering suggestions.
  • Ask the person whether it would be helpful to hear your ideas before offering your own suggestions.
  • Use “What If” questions to break through negative assumptions and false perceptions about boundaries.
  • Write down all options, including frivolous ones, on paper or on a board.
  • Traps
  • Don't stop exploring Options prematurely. Ask for one more. Ask questions to encourage the coachee to combine or build upon options to create even more options.
  • Don't discount your coachee's suggestions, even if they seem unrealistic to you.
  • Which option or options do you select?
  • How much of your goal will you use to measure progress and success?
  • What actions will you take first and when will you complete them?
  • What other actions will you take and when will you complete them?
  • What are your concerns about these actions?
  • What resistance do you expect?
  • What can you do to overcome possible resistance?
  • Who will you need to inform about your plan?
  • What additional support will you need?
  • What actions do you need to take to get and maintain support?
  • On a scale of 1 to 10, how committed are you to taking these actions?
  • What prevents this from being a ten?
  • Tips
  • Be sure that the person feels all potential options have been given reasonable consideration before proceeding to action.
  • Review the options with the person and discuss the implications, the pros and cons, of taking action on each.
  • Ask the person to rate on a one-to-ten scale the degree of certainty s/he has that s/he will carry out the actions.
  • Plan to follow up at a future date.
  • Traps
  • Avoid telling the person what you think s/he should do.
  • Offer your assistance in implementing the action plan, but don’t take over the solution yourself.
  • If you plan to follow up, make sure it is with the person’s agreement, and don’t overdo it. They should not feel you are checking on them constantly.
  • grow.txt
  • Last modified: 2017/01/17 14:55
  • by aweihs